Auckland Peace Action is organising opposition to the weapons conference that is planned for the 16 – 17 November.

The NZ DIA is hosting a parade of military hardware and a two-day arms fair at the ANZ Viaduct Events Centre, in conjunction with the RNZN 75th Anniversary celebrations.

We ask you to join us in taking a stand against the propagation of war.

Lockheed Martin is the principle sponsor and more than 500 delegates of the world’s largest weapons and arms manufacturers are expected. Here, military men can make deals to buy all the naval hardware and other weaponry on display.

Under the pretence of defence, these companies decide how best to profit from war. The event has been going on annually for the past 19 years. The years theme is Defence, Security and Industry: Shaping the next 75 years – Investing in New Zealand’s future security.

Chief sponsors include:

Lockheed Martin is the world’s largest weapons manufacturer. It describes itself as a “global security and aerospace company … principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration, and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products, and services”. It specialises in military aircraft, missiles and munitions and operates nuclear weapons systems in the US and the UK. Lockheed Martin make Trident D-5 nuclear missiles.

Babcock (NZ) have a partnering relationship with the NZ Navy to manage the Devonport Dockyard and maintain the NZ navy fleet. Overseas they are involved in the maintenance and development of nuclear-armed submarines for the British Navy, including managing Britain’s nuclear submarine bases in Scotland, such as the Trident submarine base in Faslane. They also have contracts for weapon handling and launching contracts of various nuclear vessels from other countries, for example South Korea.

CAE has contracts with the NZDF to provide “life-support and maintenance service” for helicopters purchased by the NZDF from Kaman Corporation. Overseas CAE has the contract to train operators for the USAF Predator and Reaper drones. They also have the contract for maintenance and operation of F35s in Canada (F35s are described as one of the most lethal nuclear weapon-capable planes currently available.)

GHD (formerly Gutteridge, Haskins & Davey) is a company “dedicated to understanding and helping our clients achieve their goals in the global markets of water, energy and resources, environment, property and buildings, and transportation.” In Australia they have won contracts to clean-up nuclear-testing sites; a quick online search links them with the unsafe disposal of nuclear waste in Maralinga, the atomic bomb test site in Australia.

Thales helps “governments, security agencies and critical industries protect citizens and places, sensitive data and assets. …areas of strengths include data-encryption and cyber-security, border protection and customs controls, CNI and major public event security.” NZ Greens have pointed it out as a company “intimately involved in the manufacture of cluster bombs and nuclear weapons.”

SafeAir is a wholly owned subsidiary of Air NZ and works with Kaman and Lockheed Martin. They refurbished Indonesian warplanes at the time of Indonesia’s occupation of East Timor. They have been involved in a range of military contracts in the past for assorted air forces, primarily those of NZ and Australia, and have done some work for the Israeli air force.

 

 

 

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